Skip to main content

Full text of "Donley book of fireplaces."

See other formats


?4 








DONLEY hock of 




AUG 2 5 '21 



D 






NLEYioofe 
REPLACE 






> 



3rd Edition 

Copyrighted 1925 
The Donley Bros. Co. 



The 



Donley Brothers 

13900 Miles Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 



Co. 




W. H. N^g«, Cleveland, Owner. Reynold Hinsdale, Architc 

Caenstone — Tudor Design 
Modeled and Cast by Fischer fir Jirouch Co. 



Genuine Home Fires 




URN back the pages of the history of America. Stop where you will and 
read, and you will find that the fireside has always been bonded with family 
life. Picture the American Indians gathered around their open fires to eat, 
sleep and hold councils of war. Turn forward another century in American 

history and there, too, you will find our Colonial ancestors gathered around their big 

open fires where originated the true American home life. 

And today the home fire still burns its way into the hearts of the American people. 
All the inventions and contrivances of man to do away with the open fire have been 
in vain. Present day home owners still look forward to the fascination of pleasant 
evenings before the open fire. 

To trace the story ot the home fire it is necessary to turn back far beyond American 
history to the instincts and traditions of thousands of generations of our ancestors. 
Many authorities believe that the first idea of building a roof and four walls came 
through the need of protecting the fire around which so many tribal events took 
place. Sociologists tell us that the fire of tribal savages was their most sacred pos- 
session, worshiped as a deity, and that family life only became possible when the 
individual was permitted to withdraw his own share of fire from the tribal fireplace. 

Thus, in ancient times the fire on the hearth was a veritable household god. It 
played a leading part m the religious as well as practical side of life. The fire was 
well tended, for to let it go out meant a spiritual as well as practical calamity. Relig- 
ious calamity because the fire could not be lighted without the performance of a long 
religious ceremony; practical because the fire must needs be kindled by the vigorous 
rubbing of two sticks until friction produced the necessary spark. 

The middle of the eighteenth century saw the dawn of the age of invention. Then 
man began to turn his thoughts toward improving and bettering his living conditions. 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




Munroe Walter Copper, Jr., Cleveland, Owner and Designer 

The Wiebenson Company, Builders 



Then it was that the first known 
practical study was made of the 
fireplace. Curiously enough the 
renowned sage, Benjamin Frank- 
lin, was one of the first to write 
on the practical side of fireplaces. 
He discussed them chiefly for the 
purposes of showing defects and 
promoting the idea of the Frank- 
lin stove. 

It seems as though fireplaces 
have always smoked, for such 
was the case in Franklin's time. 
It is interesting to learn that in 
his comments he mentions the 
fact that most fireplaces smoke. 

"Most of the old-fashioned 
Chimneys in Towns and Cities," 
wrote Franklin in 1844, "have been of late years reduced .... by building Jambs 
within them and narrowing the hearth and making a low Arch or Breast. These new 
Chimneys," he remarks, "tho they keep the room generally free from smoke and 
will allow a door to be shut, yet the Funnel still requiring a considerable Quantity 
of Air, it rushes in at every crevice so strongly as to make a continual whistling or 
howling and is very uncomfortable, as well as dangerous to sit against any such crevice." 

The man of Franklin's time who did the most for fireplace practice is known to 
tame as Count Rumford. Many an American who has encountered bare mention 
of his name in connection with fireplaces has wondered what the man's nationality 
might be. The name sounds English but the title of count is unknown in the 
catalogue of English nobility. 

The fact is that Count Rumford was a Massa' 
chusetts Yankee, named Benjamin Thompson. While 



one of the ablest men of his day, a scientist, states- 
man and scholar, he torfeited much possible Amen- 
in iame, when he sided with Tories in the Revc 
lutionary War, and later pc ed his life in England 
and Bavaria. 

Count Rumford's work on fireplaces represent - 
an enthusiasm that lasted throughout his life. Some 

-4 4^ 




Dr B. S Rothwell, Cleveland, Owner 
Munroe Walker Copper. Jr., Architect 



O F 



F 



I R E P L 



A C 



E 



S 




James Brown, Cleveland, Owner. H. L. Schupe, Architect 

Broc^man T^arovec Co., Builders 



of the designs presented in this 
book vary only in a minor de' 
gree from the principles and 
dimensions which he advocates. 
His ideas are set forth in his 
own words in an essay of 1798, 
which has been published in 
various forms. While the work 
of an exact mind, the writing is 
somewhat involved and makes 
difficult reading. 

He performed a valuable serv' 
ice, however, in pointing out 
the practical defects of the huge, 
deep fireplaces with their scanty 
warmth, wasteful use of fuel, 
their violent draft and their 

tendency to smoke. He reduced the fireplace to a practicable size and tremendously 
improved the radiation of heat by shallow wall depth and by splaying the side wall 
in such a way as to give the fireplace the general shape and function of a reflector. 

THE FIREPLACE OF TODAY 

The centuries of use of the fireplace and the gradual improvement of its building 
through the passing of time has made the present day, correctly built fireplace a thing 
of beauty and distinctive charm as well as a reliable heating unit. 

Years of studying of designs has given us an unlimited variety of external beauty 
in designs. Wood and stone beautifully carved and stained as well as bricks artisti' 

cally laid have made American fireplaces among 
the most beautiful in the world. 

Engineering skill has labored for years in per- 
fecting a fireplace that would not send out clouds 
of smoke into the room to mar the fireside com' 
fort. Gone, too, is the necessity of having a 
beautiful gleaming white fireplace marred by 
soot and smoke smudges. The drafty, inefficient 
fire has given away to a perfect heating unit 
giving out abundance of heat to all corners of 

Frank Sxmmehnh, Owner and Designer . , . , . . r r . 

Chas. Suesse, Bwider the room and consuming only a minimum or fuel. 




^5J> 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




Home, Sweet Home, Cleveland 
Bamball Brothers 



THE BEAUTY OF THE FIREPLACE 

As already mentioned elsewhere, fireplace 
operation has, until recent years, always 
been somewhat of a gamble. Many a home 
owner has spent time and effort in planning 
and building a beautiful fireplace only to be 
disappointed when the first fire was started. 
Perhaps the fireplace belched out clouds of 
smoke making it impossible to keep a fire 
burning. Often the beautiful fireplace front 
was ruined by soot smudges. Worst of all 
the fire may have refused to burn. In times 
past, too, the housewife did not take kindly 
to the dirty work necessary in removing the 
ashes by means of a small shovel. These fireplace draw-backs are now a thing 

of the past. 

The fireplace draft can now be regulated with certainty of results by following 
simple directions. It is no longer necessary to carry out ashes after each fire. 
Truly the centuries' old fireplace has been brought down to modern twentieth 
century efficiency. 

In passing it might be well to add that the fireplace is growing constantly and 

rapidly in favor with the Amen- 

can home owner. There is 

something about the coziness 

and warmth of the open fireside 

that appeals to the heart ot 

nearly everyone. Toasting one's 

self in front of an open log fire 
in the long winter evening is a 

luxury that almost any family 

can enjoy. 

Every home, regardless of the 
kind of construction, should 
have at least one fireplace 
There's a sentimental, decorative 
and practical advantage in the 
good looking, efficient fireplace. 
Sentimental, because many of 




H T. Jeffries, Cleveland. Ou-ner and Architect 



-K6J 



O F 



FIREPLACES 



the happiest hours of the home 
are spent in human fellowship 
before the blazing log. Decora- 
tive, because in these days of 
beautiful homes, no living room 
seems complete else it has the 
cheery open fire around which 
family and friends may gather. 
And practical, for in early sprin 
and late autumn it provides the 
necessary heat for cool evenings. 
In winter it becomes a welcome 
supplement to the home heating. 

This book mainly is written 
to attain for the husband and 
wife who are planning the new 
home, a beautiful, efficient, cozy 

and charming home fire. It is to show the home owner, architect and builder 
that a genuine home fire, such as one reads about, is not merely a dream but 




W. H. Pratt, Cleveland, Owner. H. L. Schupe, Architect 

Ceo. W. Thomas, Builder 



can 



be 




To those who are deep in the fascinating task of planning the new home and 

who desire the charming fire- 
place with its undying senti- 
ments and traditions of history 
we submit these designs and 
plans. It is our sincerest hope 
that you will not let formal 
correctness of design or lack of 
information stand between you 
and a frequent and cherry blaze 
on your hearth. It is our wish 
that your fireplace will ever 
invite you to kindle the glow- 
ing coal and the crackling log 
and that you may always have 
the fellowship of the fireside 
in your home. 




H. L. Warner, Cleveland, Owner. H. B. Burdic. Architect 

The H. W. Brown & 1 Son Co., Builders 



-4 7 h- 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




J B Clar\, Cleieland. Owner. 
Designer and Builder 



Dr. B S. Rothwcll, Cle\*land, Owner 
\iunroe Walter Cop[<r. )r. t Architect 



Tom Knight % Brecl{s\ille , Ohio, Owner, 

Designer and Builder 



H P Bennett, Clexeland, Owner 
H. L Beaxis, Dcs\gner and Builder 

A GROUP OF ROCK FIREPLACES 



^8^ 



O F 



F 



IREPLACES 



EXTERNAL FIREPLACE 

DESIGHS 

Perhaps the home owner's 
first consideration in planning 
a fireplace is the design or ex- 
ternal appearance, size and har- 
mony with the general deco- 
rative plan. In order to help you 

to select a type of fireplace that 
will fit in with your decorative 
scheme we are showing in this 
booklet a wide variety of fire- 
place designs. They range all 
the way from the 
caenstone imported 
land to the simple brick fire- 
place. There's a style for the living room and the library. All in all they 
represent a wide range in fireplace designs and costs. 

If when determining the fireplace design the owner can secure the help of an archi- 
tect or a mantel concern it is wisest to do so. If, however, the decision rests upon 
himself the following suggestions are helpful. 

Avoid the impulse to make an over-ornate fireplace. 
frequently does not "compose" itself into the general interior picture. 



expensive 
from Eng- 




/. T. Au Werter, Cleveland, Owner 
H. Casey, Architect and Buildrr 



It is not necessary 

If 



and 
any 



general architectural motive runs through the woodwork and decorations, do not 
select a contrasting architectural motive for the mantel. 

The all brick fireplace may be considered first. Every variety of standard face 

brick lends itself to fireplace construction, giving 
an effect of richness and sturdiness. Slight varia- 
tions in the bond and spacing of the brick offer 
a pleasing variety of decorative effects. 

If a brick fireplace has been decided upon the 
owner will find it very easy to select a style. 
Perhaps brick is the most popular of all materials 
for fireplaces. There are a number of brick manu- 
facturers who will submit books showing a great 
a w. Momson, Cleveland, Owner many brick designs in a wide variety of colors, 

Henry W. Grxerne, Architect i 

Bambaii Brothers, Bu.iders textures and arrangements. 




4 9 I*- 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




H. Casey, Cleveland, Owner, Architect and Builder 



When not made of brick, the 
fireplace front may be of tiles, 
stone, stucco or wood. Beautiful 
mantel fronts, not unduly expen- 
sive, are made by wood-working 
companies and are finished like 
the other woodwork. A combina- 
tion of a rich face brick imme- 
diately around the fireplace 
opening, with upper and side 
panels of wood, is justly popu- 
lar. The cabinet work may vary 
from the simple medieval treat- 
ments, of which mission is a 
familiar example, to the heavily 
ornate Jacobean, the beautiful, 

delicately figured Adam fireplaces, the delicately classical Georgian designs with 

their fluted columns, or the 

plainer Colonial outlines, some 
of which can be executed with 
plain surfaces and simple 



mouldings. 

The selection of the fireplace 
front is important in that it 
must co-ordinate and harmonize 
with the interior color scheme 
and decorative motives. 

Having selected the fireplace 
front the next point up for con- 
sideration is the interior design 
and construction. To assure 
proper and easy operation the 
most careful thought should be 
given to that part of the fire- 
place that is hidden from view, 
and the fireplace opening itself. 




Michigan "Mutual Life Insurance Company, Detroit, Owner 
Smith, Hmchman, Grylls Company, Architects 



H^IO)*- 



O F 



F 



IREPLACES 







W. H. bilges, Cleveland, Owner, Reynold Hmsdale, Architect 



IWERKAL FIREPLACE 

DESICH 

Nearly every new home builder 
gives the most careful attention to 
the exterior design of the fireplace 
in order to make it harmonize with 
interior decorations. However, in 
the majority of cases the internal 
design of the fireplace is given little 
or no attention. That's why there 
are so many "cold fireplaces. 11 

We believe that internal design 
is just as important, if not more so, 

n. We want you 
to avoid the calamity of the "cold 
fireplace 11 that is, the fireplace that 
looks beautiful but that cannot be 

used because it belches out smoke, or will not draw properly. Too often we have 

heard of and seen fireplaces that 

are fiascos simply because they 

were built wrong. 

It was Benjamin Franklin, him- 
self an authority on fireplaces, 
who said "handsome is as hand- 
some does, 11 and who knows, 
perhaps he had fireplaces in mind 
when he wrote this quotation. 
The fireplace interior must be 
correct or the exterior may be 
marred by soot and smoke. 

In the following pages we are 
presenting plans for the interior 
of the fireplace, showing the right 
mechanisms to use to produce 
the best results. If, in building, 



you 




see to it that these 



directions are followed carefully, 
you can be assured of success. 




Samuel Keller, Owner, Harry L. Schupe, Architect 
The Prospect Mantel <£>* Tile Company, Builders 



-4 1 1 h 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 



Donley Fireplace 



In the following discussion of the interior design of the fireplace and the 
proper mechanism we want to keep in mind four definite objects: 

i — Ready combustion of the fuel. 

2 — The discharge of all the smoke and gases up the chimney. 
-To radiate the greatest amount of heat in proportion to the fuel used. 



3" 

4 — The simplicity in construction of the fireplace. 

It frequently happens that an immense fireplace in a quaint, Colonial 
home will tempt a home owner to build a fireplace entirely out of propor- 
tion to the size of the room. A fire that would fill such a fireplace would 
be too hot for the moderate size room. Then, too, the larger the chimney 
the greater the exhaustion of air from the room and the greater the forced- 
in draft from the doorways, windows, crevices, etc. 

With this in mind the best general advice is to plan on a moderate size 



A living room with 300 square feet of floor space, or 

Fireplaces of 42, 




for your fireplace. 

less, is well served by a fireplace 30 to 36 inches wide. 
48, 54 and 6o'inch widths should only be constructed in rooms of cor- 
respondingly greater dimensions. 



6AJEMEN7 



fig. 1 





TABLE OF DIMENSIONS 






Use Damper 




Width 


Approx- 


Number 




of 


imate 


Rotary 


Poker 


♦Flu. 


Opening 


Height 


Control 


Control 


Regular 


M 


28 


314 


224 


8 M x 8 H 


28 


28 


330 


230 


8Hxij 


30 


30 


330 


230 


8 J< x 13 


34 


30 


336 


236 


8^ x 13 


J6 


30 


336 


236 


8 H x 18 


40 


30 


34* 


242 


8 v* % 18 


4* 


30 


342 


242 


8^ x 18 


48 


33 


348 


248 


13 x 13 


54 


36 


3^4 


m 


13 x 18 


60 


S9 


j6o 


260 


18 x 18 



Round 

10" Dia. 
10' 

12' 

12' 
12' 

if 
If 

15' 

18' 

18' 



\ V 



% - 



% « 






* » 



fc* 






*. - 



• » 



•Note — The area of the Fireplace Opening should not 
exceed twelve and one^half times the net flue area. 

If proper size flue lining is not available use next largest size. 



THE FLUE 

In addition to the above suggestions 
on size of opening, there is another factor 
that plays an important part in determin- 
ing size. That is the size of flue opening 

If the chimney is built before the 
question of the fireplace is taken up, care 
should be used that the size of the fireplace 
opening is not more than twelve and one- 
half times the net area of the flue section. 
(See Table of Dimensions, Page 12.) 

For example, a fireplace 30 inches wide 
and 30 inches high has an area in the 



opening of 900 square inches. The inside area of the smallest 
flue that can be used would be 72 square inches. The com- 
mercial lining nearest to this area is the 8^x 13 inches, having 
an area of 80 square inches. These dimensions are based on 
fireplaces built according to our instructions and is not neces' 
Badly applicable to fireplaces built according to other plans. 

The cn> sectional area of the flue should be maintained 
throughout its height. If it is made smaller at any part, for 

-4121* 



Out-iJe 




Inside 


Dimensions 




Area 


8H* 84 


inches 


52 sq. inches 


8Hx ix 




80 U M 


8hxi8 




104 


IX X 13 




126 " M 


IX x 18 




169 M " 


18 x 18 




240 



o 



F 



F 



I 



R 



E 



P 



L 



A 



C 



E 



S 



onstruction Plans 



IW 1LANT0? Si&T k**LL Of SMO*€ CHAMOt* 
StWULD e re* ro fiGUtttS snort* 

carou: s of 'Atom or rrttifXACc a^w^C. 



any reason, the result is the same as if it were all 
built the size of the smallest part. 

A factor of safety in flue size is advantageous, 
up to 20 % excess over the above requirements. 
A greater factor presents no noticeable advantage. 

The ideal flue has a circular section, owing to 
the tendency for the smoke to ascend in a spiral 
column. Next best is a square or nearly square 
section. A section markedly oblong should have 
a factor of safety in its sectional capacity. Square 
and oblong flue linings permit of easier and less 
expensive masonry work. 

Flues sloping to one side in reaching main 
chimney should have a factor of safety correspond- 
ing to degree of slope. The recommended angle 
is 30 degrees from the perpendicular — more than 
45 degrees is dangerous. In rough brick work 
make fireplace opening one foot wider and 12 to 
18 inches higher than the finished fireplace opening. In Figure 3 the coarse hatching indicates rough 
brick work; close hatching indicates material placed at time damper is installed and the finished fire- 
place is built. 




RELATIOH OF FIREPLACE PARTS 

Notice particularly the table of dimensions, Page 12. 
Do not get the impression that the designs shown in this 
book work well under all conditions. The plans are of 
a single size and warning is issued against the conclusion 
that, in building a large fireplace, it is only necessary to 
take the plan of a small fireplace and enlarge the dimen- 
sions. This is a mistaken idea. 

Use this table of limits as a guide in changes of scale. 
Notice particularly that the width is the principal varia- 
ble. The height is pretty well fixed in practice as from 

o to 34 inches, probably in deference to the height 
of the flame and also with some view to proper mantel 
height. Fireplace depth is determined to a certain 
extent by wall depth or by the feasible projection into 
the room. Wall depth should be 18 to 20 inches for 

mall fireplaces with little advantage in greater depth 



Ut L'N'A*t 



Sujms ChambiR 



*fj*f jHtLr 



D*\i?LR 




F* 3 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




for larger fireplaces. A shallow opening throws out more 
heat than a deep one. There are no advantages in specially 
high or deep fireplaces but there are many disadvantages. If 
you want a larger fireplace make it wider and, only in minor 
degree vary the height or depth. Above all use the table of 
dimensions to assure accuracy. 



fig. 4 




HOW TO SHAPE THE FIREPLACE FOR HEAT RADIATIOH 

The shape of the fireplace determines the amount of heat a fireplace will radiate. By making wall 
depth too great or by making the ascent of the flame too nearly vertical, much heat is going up the 
chimney. 

The shape of the side walls of the fireplace also 
is very important to the giving off of heat. Right' 
angle side walls or side walls that go straight back 
from the fireplace front and having a square rear 
corner create a corner area in which some heat is 
wasted, having a tendency to pass up the chimney 
and be lost. 

The wall angle we recommend slants from front 
to rear at an angle of five inches to the foot, begin" 

ning one course of brick from the fireplace front, about four inches. Figure 5 bears on this particular 
angle of the fireplace side wall. 

The angle of five inches to the foot is not arbitrarily chosen but has been selected with utmost care, 
after consultation with many successful fireplace builders and the examination of hundreds of plans. 

^^ ammm ^ a ^^ It represents a wide consensus of 

opinion. We do not aim to introduce 
a special form of fireplace in the inter- 
est of Donley Equipment but we do 
recognize the desirability of a stand- 
ardized wall angle in the interest of 
better fireplaces and have taken our 
own first step in that direction. 




Photograph 7^o. i . Photograph show 
mg mason starting the fireplace. The 
rough bnei( wor\ has been finished. The 
top of rough opening is arched although 
many builders use angle iron instead. 
Above and bac\ of arch is funnel 
smo\e<hamber as shown by 
lines in Figure 2 y Page 13. 
the mason splaying the side 
Details of this angle shown m 
Figures 4 and 5. The Donley Ash 
Dump 15 in floor of fireplace at the 
bac\. The crated damper is leaning 
against wall. 



shaped 
dotted 
police 
walls. 



-4 14 K 



o 



F 



F 



I 



R 



E 



P 



L 



A 



C 



E 



S 




Figure 6. 



illustrating heat radiation from a fireplace, havmg 
properly designed side and rear walls. 



The same general result may be obtained by a 

slightly greater or less angle than five inches to the 

foot but there are reasons for standardizing the 

wall angle. The most important reason is that we 

get an excellent amount of heat radiation from this 

angle. It is also correct for the Donley Damper 

(see Fig. 4) and fits the Donley Fire Basket. It 

was necessary to standardize this angle to prevent 
possible misfit in using these devices. 

From photograph No. 1, showing fireplace being 
built you can see how this angle looks when being 
constructed by the mason. 



THROWING THE HEAT FORWARD 



From Fig. 3 you will see the upper part of the back wall slanting forward meeting the rear flange of 
the damper a few inches above the elevation of 
the fireplace openin 
functions. 



. This slope performs two 
First, it deflects heat into the room 



because the rapidly ascending air current con- 
stantly tends to draw the heat up the chimney. 
Ascending heat waves striking the sloping 
back are thrown forward beneath the breast 
wall, while the smoke is drawn upward through 
the throat into the smoke chamber and out the 
flue. 





Figure 7. Detailed measurements of sizes of different parts of 

the Donley Damper. 

^^^^ The sloping wall also helps form the 

smoke shelf with which we deal later. 



PLEHTT OF HEAT— HO SMOKE 
To draw off all the smoke and gases 
without losing undue heat requires a 
correct adjustment of the throat aper- 
ture. This can best be effected by 
means of a dependable damper under 
easy control. 

Other things may cause smoking, 
besides the wrong size or throat 
aperture. For example: 

1 — Roughness of the fireplace throat. 
2 — Too narrow a throat, that is, a 



Photograph A(o. 2. In this £>hotO' 

graph the mason is shaping bac\ wall 

fcruard to give better radiation of heat 

and to form smo\e'shelf. The Po\er 

Control Damper uncrated at left. 



-cf 15 p»- 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




Photograph A[o. 3. The side and 
rear fireplace walls of narrow Roman 
brick completed ready for damper. 
?{ote interesting effect of soldier course 
of Roman brick- The back wall sloped 
forward is held by temporary support. 
This forward slope in cross 'section, 
and use of fire brick for back and side' 
walls, a common practice, are shown 
in Fig. 3. 



damper not as long as the width of the 
fireplace opening. 3 — Rough masonry 
in the smoke-chamber or in the flue. 
4 — Too small a flue. 5 — Too low a 
position of the damper and throat. 6 — 
Arched openings are more liable to 
cause smoke than rectangular opening. 
7 — Height of chimney in relation to 
ridge of roof or other outside causes. 
8 — Improper construction of smoke 
chamber. 



SIZE DAMPER TO USE 
The Donley Damper is an effective safeguard against several of the chief causes of smoking. It is 
more than a damper. It offers a complete metal throat passage, insuring a smooth means of exit for the 
products of combustion, out of the fireplace and into the smoke chamber. 

The Donley Damper also offers 
means of getting sufficient throat 
capacity, providing the right sue 
damper is used. Select the size, in 
inches, corresponding to the width of 
your fireplace opening. See table of 
dimensions, Page 12. If your opening 
is an "in-between" size, use the next 
larger size of Donley Damper. 

We recommend placing the Damper 
one to three courses of brick above the 
breast line of the opening. The higher 
position offers a greater security against 



Photograph ?^p. 4. The Damper has 
now been set in place. The rear flange 
of the damper rests on the sloping back 
wall that helps form the smoke-shelf. 
In this photo the Damper is set farther 
back than usual to allow for stone facing. 




-A 16 fc- 



O F 



F 



I 



REPLACES 




smoke eddies 



heat. 



The lower position tends to give more 
The damper is placed at the front of the fire- 
place as shown in Figure 3, the back of the fireplace 
sloping forward to form smoke shelf. See photograph, 
No. 3. The forward flange of damper rests in the 
face brick in the fireplace; the side and rear flange 
rests on the fire brick. The front flange should bear 
the same relation to the finished face of the fireplace 
as that shown in Figure 3. 

The damper operating rod for rotary control is 
furnished as in Figure 3. Upon request we can 
furnish longer rods to meet particular conditions. 

SMOK&CHAMBER 

From the throat, the smoke passes into the smoke- 
chamber, which has a pyramid-like section as it nar- 
rows to size of flue. See Figure 2, Page 13. Its sides 
should have a slope of about 7 inches in 1 foot of height. Too abrupt an 
angle congests the smoke and causes eddies in the room. The interior 
masonry should be smooth and the outlet to the chimney accomplished 
without obstacle. The flue lining starts at the top of smoke-chamber. 



Chimney Woe 



flue Lining 



■Smote Chamber- 



Smoke SAetf 
Throet 



Figure 6. Showing how 
dowri'dr aft causes 
smol{€ eddies where 
smofy'shelf is omitted. 



flrmptoe* 




Figure 7. Showing how 
down-draft is diverted 
upward from smo^e- 
shelf. This and did' 
gram opposite ta\en 
from U.S. Government 
pamphlet. 



I 



Where the flue is offset in order to reach a chimney-stack a few feet 
distant, the offset should not be started in the smoke-chamber. Finish the chamber exactly as though 
the flue were to be straight and commence the flue slope where it connects with the chamber. Other- 

. wise, the fireplace will draw unevenly 

on the two sides. 

Between damper and rear wall of 
chamber is the horizontal flat surface 
called the smoke-shelf. Located direct- 
ly under the flue, it arrests falling soot 
and acts as a baffle for the down-draft, 
breaking its force and deflecting it up- 
ward into the ascending current, in- 
stead of forcing ascending smoke out 
into the room. Note the diagram of 
smoke-shelf, Page 13, Figure 3. 

The smoke-chamber must be large 
enough and properly shaped if the fire- 
place is to work well. Its cubic capacity 




Photograph J\[o. 5. The opening be' 
tween damper and rough br\c\ being 
closed up. The damper acting as a 
lintel supporting br\c\{ wor\ that closes 
up smo\e -chamber. Damper is about 
6 inches above top of finished fireplace 
opening, see next photograph. 



-4 17 >- 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 




Photograph J^o. 6. The mason put- 
ting finishing touches on stone facing 
around opening. T^otice design of 
Roman hric!{ in hearth as well as side 
walls. The fireplace is now ready for 
front hearth and fireplace front. 



reduces the violence of draft impulses 
from above and below, giving it a sort 
of shock absorbing function. 

HOW TO DEAL WITH 
DOWH'DRAFT 

Down-draft is present in all chim- 
neys due to compensation for up-draft 
from fire, adjusting differences of tenv 
perature between outside and inside, to 
actual winds, or combination of these 
three causes. 

Where there is a narrow, sloping 
passage, instead of a smoke-chamber 
with its smoke-shelf, the down-draft 
at times will drive part of the smoke 
back into the room. 
Many complicated arrangements have been devised for checking down-draft, but they are not 
necessary, if the fireplace is built according to our instructions. 

The force of the down-draft can be arrested and diverted up the chimney by means of the open 
valve-plate of the Donley Damper which, in conjunction with the smoke-shelf acts as a smoke-deflector. 
See Figure 3, Page 13. Quite frequently large trees near a chimney top deflect wind down the 
chimney, forcing smoke into the room. 
A chimney should rise not less than 
30 inches above highest point of roof. 
Let the flue lining project 3 to 6 inches 
above the chimney. 

Follow these directions carefully — 
take no chances — see that the fireplace 
builder follows the plan sheet that comes 
attached to every Donley Damper crate . 
Above all use the Donley Damper for 
proper draft action, a Donley Ash Dump 
to remove the ashes quickly and con- 
veniently and a Donley Ash Pit Door 
for final removal of the ashes. Finish off 
the fireplace with the Donley Fire Basket 
and add the last beautifying touch 
with a pair of Donley Andirons. 

Photograph 7>{o. 7. The finished fire- 
place with panelled wood mantel or 
fireplace front. Donley Fire Basket and 
Andirons. 

I.C Geist, Owner 
E. O. Lauffer, Architect 
Clyde A. Prouty, Builder 




-4 18 1* 



O F 



F 



IREPLACES 




ROT ART CONTROL 

To open or close this damper you rotate the 
knob that protrudes through mantel front. 

Diagram shows 
mechanism. 




Donley Fireplace Damper 

An indispensable aid to the proper burning of any fireplace, the Donley Damper provides a smooth, 
properly formed metal throat for the fireplace as well as a means of controlling the draft. It is made 
with two types of control, the Rotary, operated through the fireplace or mantel front, and the Poker, 
operated by means of a poker, as illustrated in this page. The Poker Control Damper has a simple and 
effective mechanism and is inconspicuous; the Rotary Control Damper is more convenient to operate - 
Please state desired style in ordering. 

Donley Dampers simplify the mason's task in forming fireplace throat. The smooth, correct lines 
insure drawing off smoke and fumes without the eddies and belching of smoke and prevents the nuisance 
of soot smudges on the fireplace front. 

Perfect draft control by means of the Donley Damper prevents waste of heat up the chimney and 
gives maximum warmth with economy of fuel. It is a favorite device of house builders, everywhere 
and when the fireplace is built according to Donley it is the home owner's best guarantee of fireplace 
satisfaction. 



Poker 


Rotary 


Throat Sue 


Overall 


Shipping 


Control 


Control 


Front 


Length 


Weight 


224 


3*4 


H" 


30* 


34 lbs. 


230 


330 


30' 


3^' 


36 kW 


236 


336 


36* 


4** 


40 - 


242 


34* 


4*' 


48' 


fa . 

53 


248 


348 


48' 


14' 


56 * k 


^54 


354 


54' 


59' 


94 


260 


360 


6o' 


6f 


100 



POKER COHTROL 

Diagram shows how 
this damper is con- 
trolled by hooking an 
ordinary poker into 
ring and pushing or 
pulling until desired 
position is reached. 




% 19 J=- 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 



Donley Andirons 



Andirons, as we know them today, have a unique history. No one knows exactly when they were 
first used but museum curators will show us andirons whose origin can be traced back a thousand years. 
An interesting fact is that the oldest andirons in existence have practically the same shape and struc- 
tural lines as our modern andirons. 

In the fifteenth century andirons were called fire dogs because the andiron top was shaped like a 
dog's head. Later they were called andirons from "hand irons" or "end irons." Some of these ancient 
fire dogs cast of iron in the sixteenth century weighed two hundred pounds. 

It would require a book to describe all of the countless forms that the andiron has taken on its march 
through centuries. However, the eighteenth century found the andiron in grotesque shapes such as 
dog heads, twisted flames, women's heads, claw feet and steeples. Of special interest are the Marching 
Hessians of 1776, an outgrowth of the Revolution, and the Ball Topped Andiron of the same period. 

Andirons have always been used primarily for supporting logs in the fireplace. At one time hooks 

were added upon which to hang pots, kettles and spits, 
and a tripod placed at the top to support cooking vessels. 



These andirons of past ages were made of bronze, iron 
or brass, sometimes being decorated with silver or enamel. 
In recent years andirons have been made mainly of iron 
and have been used primarily for decoration. 

Now that you have finished your fireplace, you will 
need a pair of beautiful andirons to set off the picture. 
Andirons are the furniture of the hearth. Without them 
your fireplace will seem as incomplete as a room without 
furniture. They are essential to modern fireplace decora' 
tion in that they give a finishing touch of beauty and 
mess. Andirons will add to the comforts and pleasures of long winter evenings before your 
open fire. 

In the Donley Andirons you will find beauty culled from the ancient smithy *s work united 
with the grace, simplicity and pleasing charm of modern decoration. They have a quiet dignified 
d i that harmonizes with the most beautiful modern 
firepl :. Sj il at mon has also been given to their 
utiht ind sturdiness. The live Donley Andirons shown 
h sc exclusive in beauty of design. They are made 
of highest quality ca^t iron. Each pair of Andirons comes 
pad 1 in a separate box plainly marked with Style, 
Size and Weight. 

THE SE\TI\EL 




The Sentinel 



The Sentinel is well named. Toppin its tall tapering 
figure is the steeple top of andirons of yore combined with 




The Regal 



<«20^ 



O F 



F 



I 



REPLACES 




a modern architectural simplicity and grace. The Senti- 
nel is worthy of a place on the hearth of the American 
home. It stands 20 Y 2 inches high. It is finished in 
Statuary Bronze, Antique Brass and Black. Shipping 
weight 44 lbs. 

THE REGAL 

In the Regal can be seen the reflection of the eighteenth 
century style in its graceful, correct porportions and its 
hall top. The andiron is decorated on the shaft with tulip 
petals giving a modern and unique turn to its beauty. This 
is the tallest of the group of five, standing 22 inches high. 
It is a correct andiron for the medium and larger fireplace. Shipping weight 48 lbs. Finish 

Statuary Bronze, Antique Brass and Black. 

THE WIHDSOR 

In the urn standing on top of this andiron we have a beautiful Old English type. Coupled 
with the urn is the tapering decorated shaft that gives a twentieth century tone to this old 
design. The Windsor is 18 H inches tall and has a beauty and grace that makes it a favorite with 
all who see it. Finished in Statuary Bronze, Antique Brass and Black. Shipping weight 35 lbs. 



The Windsor 




THE SPARTAN 

The Spartan appeals to the conservative. While it 
bears on its shaft the twisted flame design of centuries 
gone by, still it also carries a certain conservativeness of 
lines that brings out a dignity of its own. The Spartan 
reaches a height of 20 inches and is of particular artistic 
value in the dignified fireplace. Shipping weight 44 lbs. 
In Statuary Bronze, Antique Brass and Black finish. 



The Spartan 



THE STAHDISH 

Standing but 14 }4 inches high, the Standish is a partial 
replica of earlier days. It is immediately marked for an 
andiron of early Colonial period. Its loop shaped top 
nd its peculiarly charming designing on the front gives 
it a character of its own. The Standish gives grace and 
charm to the smaller fireplace. Comes finished in Statuary 
Bronze, Antique Brass and Black. Shipping weight 25 lbs. 




The Standish 



4 2 1 I> 



THE 



DONLEY 



BOOK 



Donley Fire Basket 




After you have built the fireplace according to the plans in this booklet and have installed the 
Donley Damper, you will want to set off the fireplace with a good looking Donley Fire Basket. 
Beauty and utility are combined in the Donley Fire Basket. Its lines are simple, graceful and correct, 
and its construction sturdy enough to withstand hard usage for many years. Having no eccentricity 
of design it harmonises with any decorative scheme the architect may prefer and is a ready seller for 
every class of residence. Remove the ends, by lifting them out, and burn wood of any length that the 
fireplace will take. Construction safeguards against falling out of ends, through warping. 

This basket narrows toward the rear at just the degree to fit a properly splayed hearth plan, thereby 
solving the difficulty that careful fireplace designers sometimes experience in finding a basket to fit their 
plan. Experience shows that sides splayed at this angle radiate heat into the room more effectually 
than square-cornered fireplaces. 









Shipping 


Front 


Depth 


Back 


Weight 


*4' 




1 2 ! / 


(>\ II19. 


28' 




16 ' / 


69 " 


30' 




18 ' ,' 


73 " 


34" 




22 I ■/ 


80 " 


40' 




28'/ 


yo 



Donley Ash -Dumps 

Donley A>h-Durnps are iron trap-doors closing the ash-pit and excluding dust and odor from living 
rooms. They are a part of every well equipped fireplace. Automatic Ash-Dump closes itself after 
ashes have been pushed through it. Common Ash-Dump is opened and closed by poker. Shuttei 
cannot come loose or fall in ash-pit. 





<*22J- 



O F 



F 



I R E P L 



ACES 



Donley Ash-Pit Doors 

Donley Ash-pit Doors or Clean-out Doors are of original design, which promotes strength, neatness 
and close fit- Larger sizes are used for removing ashes and smaller sizes at bases of chimney flues for 
removing soot. The 8 x 10 size is frequently used for re- 
moving ashes but the 10 x 12 is more convenient. 



Size 

7'x 9/ 
8'x 8' 
8'xio* 

IO*XI2* 
I2"XI5' 

*Steel door 



Shipping 
Weight 

66 lbs. doz. 
66 
86 
126 

164 
{Double door. 






- - 



. - 



* • 



*. - it 



Size 

24*xi8' 

30*X24" 

*30'x24 i ' 

t30'x$o* 



Shipping 
Weight 

440 lbs. doz 
1320 " " 

840 
2020 



it tt 



u » ■ 




Donley Ratchet Damper 




This damper has poker-controlled valve-plate, also sliding 
shutter for additional draft adjustment. A good, practical 
means of draft control, but without throat-forming feature. 





Length Over 


All 




No. 






Shipping 




Front 


Back 


Weight 


124 


24- 


22' 


13 lbs. 


126 


26' 


24' 


14 


128 


28' 


26' 


i*H " 


130 


30' 


28' 


17 • 


132 


3** 


jo* 


18 ' ; " 


136 


J6« 


34' 


20 


142 


4*' 


40' 


21 ', " 


148 


48' 


46' 


27 



Donley Steel Angles 




These angles are used at the top of the rough brick 
opening and also at the top of the finished fireplace 
opening. Builders find them to be more economical in 
the rough fireplace opening than the making of arches. 
Order these steel angles with the Damper. They may be had in sizes and lengths as follows: 

jxjx J4", also 4 x 3 x \i'\ in lengths 30", 36", 42", 48", 54". For larger fireplaces 4 x 4 x \i" angles in 
lengths 60", 66" and 72". Special lengths to order. 

. 4 23 I> 



ONLEY 
E VICES 

Complete the Home 




^ 



Printed by The William Frathrr Compftfiy, Cleveland! Ohio